Brent Fleischer

Take a Luxury Nile Cruise to Discover Ancient Egypt

If you are searching for a romantic, relaxing way to visit the top tourist sites of Ancient Egypt, there is just one way to do this – take a luxury Nile cruise. Along the banks of the Nile is where the ancient Egyptians lived, and this is why most of the Pharaoh’s tombs and temples were built near or on its banks, and why the best way of navigating the attraction is on the water itself.

If you are considering going on a cruise, or are about to set out on one, we have chosen our favourite sites from the ancient world that you want to be sure to visit in order to make the most of this amazing destination. You can begin your cruise from Cairo in the north, or start your journey in the south from Awan or Luxor. In this article, we will be following the current of the Nile river and still begin our sightseeing journey from the gorgeous city of Aswan, which is ancient Egypt’s southernmost frontier. Later, we will be focusing on Luxor and Cairo.

Aswan – The Nile’s Real Jewel

Aswan was Ancient Egypt’s southernmost frontier and the most beautiful part of the Nile. It flows around the emerald islands and cuts through the golden deserts. Known as Swenet or Swen originally, it was the gateway of Africa and an important crossroads of trade. It was also a place where granite was quarried for a majority of the temples and monuments that were built during ancient times. Aswan is an excellent place to visit and features a relaxed Nubian culture that is very different from the frenetic activity of Cairo or the bustling tourism of Luxor. There are several must-see attractions in Aswan to visit, including:

Abu Simbel – It isn’t easy to get to this ancient temple complex. However, it is definitely well worth the effort. The temple was built under the reign of Rameses II. It is made up of two chambers and guarded by four large statues of Rameses. This impressive structure was carved into a rock face originally, which took 20 years. The temple was relocated during the 1960s in order to protect it against erosion as a result of the Aswan High Dam construction process.

Temple of Isis at Philae – Many consider this temple to be the final one that was built in classic Egyptian style. UNESCO relocated this impressive temple before construction started on the Aswan High Dam. It features soaring columns and amazing hieroglyphics, along with a Light and Sound Show that visitors can enjoy.

Kom Ombo – The rare double temple was dedicated to the falcon god Haroeris and the crocodile god Sobek. This soaring structure is completely symmetrical and has multiple chambers that were formally courts, temples, sanctuaries, and halls. Transport yourself back to ancient times as you stroll among the multiple colonnades.

Temple of Horus at Edfu – This temple is located on the West Bank of the Nile, 60 km …

Every thing You Want To Know About On-line Coupon Codes

Coupon shoppingNot too long ago favorited shoppers: Gives will probably be sent to individuals who favorited something in your store forty eight hours after they favorited that merchandise. Shoppers can obtain a proposal e mail h&m coupon for this viewers every 7 days and might obtain a max of 6 presents per ship. If a buyer favorites an merchandise and then removes that item from their favorites inside 48 hrs, they will not receive a favorited item e-mail.

In case you’re not pleased along with your buy from The Procuring Channel for any purpose, you’re free to return it. The Purchasing Channel returns policy provides you 30 days to send your order back for a full refund. Each order comes with an Easy Return Canada Post transport label, however returns are only free in the event you obtain a improper or broken item. To get your refund, affix the label to your bundle and mail it again to The Purchasing Channel; you may receive your refund (minus transport costs) within 15 enterprise days.

Frugaa’s web site might look like it is from the mid-90s, but it surely would not operate like that. In keeping with their website , they’ve over 40,000 coupons accessible, over 9,000 free shipping presents, and the average person saves a whopping $28 every time they use Frugaa.

The nice thing about Checkout 51 is that it’s not as model particular as among the others. For example, you’ll earn cash back for buying generic issues like bananas, green onions and apples. In addition to that, you may get bonuses only for buying any merchandise at choose shops like Costco or Walmart.

What is the catch? There may be heavy restrictions on the forms of codes you may mix, and the shop could not have multiple coupon obtainable that applies to your order. Combining two proportion- or greenback-off coupons is less likely to work, but a free delivery code with a kind of affords sometimes will. Regardless, it by no means hurts to experiment with available codes at any retailer that permits for stacking, to find out if they’re accepted collectively.

Waitrose used to hand out disposable coffee cups for this freebie, but in 2018 it stopped this for environmental reasons (see our Waitrose ditches disposable cups information story). For the place else you can save with a reusable cup, see MSE Rhiannon’s Cup Reductions guide.

The cell app helps with financial savings at a range of major retail stores and chains along with the coupon codes you may find on the website. The massive downside of RetailMeNot, nonetheless, is that whenever you click on to reveal a coupon code on the website, it opens up the web site again in a brand new tab, and you’ll have to go back to the website to copy the coupon code. But that little inconvenience is not sufficient to deter from big financial savings.…

The Single Girl Backpacker

Location: Safety first! As a single girl, it’s important. Vacation at a place that is safe. Sure, you can go off the beaten track, but then also make sure that you know the place and the locals well. The place should be well connected by air,sea or land. Whatever the transport, make sure you have one ready at any time in case you need to exit fast. As they say, prevention is better than cure.

Culture: Respect the culture of the place that you visit. Try to blend with the locals. In certain countries women are suggested to dress conservatively, especially at religious sites. It is offensive in some places to wear shorts, short skirts, sleeveless. Therefore, dress appropriately according to the place that you visit. Carry a spare skirt or long scarf. That way, you can always “dress up” for the place.

Important contact numbers: Keep all your important numbers handy. The embassy number, the nearest hospital,ICE (In Case of Emergency) number,friends,loved ones. Make it a point to write/call regularly. This is to ensure that your loved ones know that you are still around. Keep a little diary of all important contacts as backup.

Lodging: Stay is very important. If you are single, and travelling on a budget, what you should consider are hostels, couch surfers, etc. Try the search engine for like minded travellers would have posted their experiences along with photographs of these  will give you a brief idea of the amenities and type of place that you would like. If you are the frequent traveller, it would be a good idea to look out for a hostel chain. This way you don’t need to research again and are assured of similar quality and services a new vacation spot.

Food: Wherever you are in the world, it’s the one thing you should be careful about. Preferably know what goes in your food. If you like to try new cuisines, which you will, knowing you are on a vacation, know what goes in it. Especially in South east Asian countries, where you have unlimited options to suit your palate and limited language vocabulary. Watch out for the Travellers’ diarrhoea (TD). Food and water hygiene can make or break your vacation.

Shopping: Ah! On every girl’s list! Craft, malls, flea markets, thrift  you can, it might be a good idea to enlist the help of a local. Or, invite suggestions from various travel forums. Keep a lookout for great buys where some countries have promotional, off season and festival sales. Newspapers are also a great way to find out advertised deals.

Personal belongings: A girl without her purse is like a painting without  you are someone like me who likes to tote around a big handbag, then it would be prudent to keep your money in different places. Do not carry all your money in one place. Keep some in your handbag, some in your backpack, some on yourself. That way, even if something unfortunate happens to it, you …

Quels sont les avantages et les risques de la liposuccion?

La liposuccion, également appelée lipoplastie, succion de liposculpture, lipectomie ou lipo, est un type de chirurgie esthétique qui décompose et “aspire” la graisse du corps.

Il est souvent utilisé sur l’abdomen, les cuisses, les fesses, le cou, le menton, le haut et le dos des bras, les mollets et le dos.

La graisse est éliminée par un instrument creux appelé canule. Ceci est inséré sous la peau. Un puissant vide à haute pression est appliqué à la canule.

La liposuccion geneve est l’opération cosmétique la plus courante aux États-Unis. Chaque année, plus de 300 000 procédures sont effectuées aux États-Unis, pour un coût allant d’environ 2 000 à 3 500 dollars.

Faits saillants sur la liposuccion

Voici quelques points clés sur la liposuccion. Plus de détails sont dans l’article principal.

• L’opération est normalement réalisée sous anesthésie générale.

• La liposuccion n’est pas un outil de perte de poids, mais une procédure cosmétique aux effets subtils.

• Les risques incluent l’infection et les cicatrices

• La liposuccion peut être utilisée pour traiter certaines conditions médicales.

Qu’est-ce que la liposuccion?

La liposuccion n’est pas une méthode globale de perte de poids.

Les personnes qui subissent une liposuccion ont généralement un poids corporel stable mais souhaitent éliminer les dépôts indésirables de graisse corporelle dans des parties spécifiques du corps.

La liposuccion n’est pas une méthode globale de perte de poids. Ce n’est pas un traitement pour l’obésité.

La procédure ne supprime pas la cellulite, les fossettes ni les vergetures. Le but est esthétique. Il convient à ceux qui souhaitent changer et améliorer le contour de leur corps.

La liposuccion élimine de façon permanente les cellules graisseuses et modifie la forme du corps. Cependant, si le patient ne mène pas un mode de vie sain après l’opération, il existe un risque que les cellules adipeuses restantes grossissent.

La quantité de graisse pouvant être éliminée en toute sécurité est limitée.

Il existe certains risques, notamment une infection, un engourdissement et des cicatrices. Si trop de graisse est enlevée, il peut y avoir des bosses ou des bosses dans la peau. Les risques chirurgicaux semblent être liés à la quantité de graisse enlevée.…

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Canva Uncovered: How A Young Australian Kitesurfer Built A $3.2 Billion (Profitable!) Startup Phenom

On a steamy May morning in 2013, Canva CEO Melanie Perkins found herself adrift on a kiteboard in the channel between billionaire Richard Branson’s private Necker and Moskito islands. Her 30-foot sail floating deflated and useless beside her in the strong eastern Caribbean current, the 26-year-old entrepreneur waited for hours to be rescued. As she treaded water, her left leg scarred by a past collision with a coral reef, she reminded herself that her dangerous new hobby was worth it. After all, it was key to the fundraising strategy for the design-software startup she’d cofounded with her boyfriend six years before. Canva was based in Australia, thousands of miles from tech’s Silicon Valley power corridor. Getting a meeting—much less funding—was proving tough. Perkins heard “no” from more than 100 investors. So when she met the organizer of a group of kitesurfing venture capitalists at a pitch competition in her native Perth, Perkins got to training. The next time the group met to hear startup pitches and potentially write crucial early-stage funding checks, she’d have a seat at the table—even if it meant having to brave treacherous waters. “It was like, risk: serious damage; reward: start company,” Perkins says. “If you get your foot in the door just a tiny bit, you have to kind of wedge it all the way in.” Such perseverance has long been a necessity at Canva, which began as a modest yearbook-design business in the state capital of Perth on Australia’s west coast. From those remote origins, Canva has grown into a global juggernaut. Twenty-million-plus users from 190 countries use the company’s “freemium” Web-based app to design everything from splashy Pinterest graphics to elegant restaurant menus. Besides an impossible-to-beat price (millions of users pay nothing at all), Canva’s key advantage over rival products from tech giants like Adobe has been its ease of use. Before Canva, amateurs had to stitch together designs in Microsoft Word or pay through the nose for confusing professional tools. Today, anyone, anywhere, can download Canva and be creating within ten minutes. The company’s revenue comes from upselling to a $10-a-month premium version with snazzier features or, more recently, from sales of a streamlined corporate account option. High-quality stock photos—of which Canva has millions—cost another $1. It adds up. This year the company expects to more than double its revenue to $200 million; its most recent $85 million funding round valued it at $3.2 billion. Perkins, now 32 and an alum of the 2016 Forbes 30 Under 30 Asia list, has an estimated 15% stake, valued at $430 million. Throw in her 34-year-old cofounder—and now fiancé—Cliff Obrecht’s similar stake, and the Aussie power couple are likely worth more than $800 million. In an era of billion-dollar checks from SoftBank and high-profile profligacy at WeWork, Perkins and Obrecht do things differently. They are couch surfers who prefer budget trips to private jets. (This summer, with Canva already valued at…

sample accessily post 3

Canva Uncovered: How A Young Australian Kitesurfer Built A $3.2 Billion (Profitable!) Startup Phenom

On a steamy May morning in 2013, Canva CEO Melanie Perkins found herself adrift on a kiteboard in the channel between billionaire Richard Branson’s private Necker and Moskito islands. Her 30-foot sail floating deflated and useless beside her in the strong eastern Caribbean current, the 26-year-old entrepreneur waited for hours to be rescued. As she treaded water, her left leg scarred by a past collision with a coral reef, she reminded herself that her dangerous new hobby was worth it. After all, it was key to the fundraising strategy for the design-software startup she’d cofounded with her boyfriend six years before. Canva was based in Australia, thousands of miles from tech’s Silicon Valley power corridor. Getting a meeting—much less funding—was proving tough. Perkins heard “no” from more than 100 investors. So when she met the organizer of a group of kitesurfing venture capitalists at a pitch competition in her native Perth, Perkins got to training. The next time the group met to hear startup pitches and potentially write crucial early-stage funding checks, she’d have a seat at the table—even if it meant having to brave treacherous waters. “It was like, risk: serious damage; reward: start company,” Perkins says. “If you get your foot in the door just a tiny bit, you have to kind of wedge it all the way in.” Such perseverance has long been a necessity at Canva, which began as a modest yearbook-design business in the state capital of Perth on Australia’s west coast. From those remote origins, Canva has grown into a global juggernaut. Twenty-million-plus users from 190 countries use the company’s “freemium” Web-based app to design everything from splashy Pinterest graphics to elegant restaurant menus. Besides an impossible-to-beat price (millions of users pay nothing at all), Canva’s key advantage over rival products from tech giants like Adobe has been its ease of use. Before Canva, amateurs had to stitch together designs in Microsoft Word or pay through the nose for confusing professional tools. Today, anyone, anywhere, can download Canva and be creating within ten minutes. The company’s revenue comes from upselling to a $10-a-month premium version with snazzier features or, more recently, from sales of a streamlined corporate account option. High-quality stock photos—of which Canva has millions—cost another $1. It adds up. This year the company expects to more than double its revenue to $200 million; its most recent $85 million funding round valued it at $3.2 billion. Perkins, now 32 and an alum of the 2016 Forbes 30 Under 30 Asia list, has an estimated 15% stake, valued at $430 million. Throw in her 34-year-old cofounder—and now fiancé—Cliff Obrecht’s similar stake, and the Aussie power couple are likely worth more than $800 million. In an era of billion-dollar checks from SoftBank and high-profile profligacy at WeWork, Perkins and Obrecht do things differently. They are couch surfers who prefer budget trips to private jets. (This summer, with Canva already valued at…

sample accessily post 3

Canva Uncovered: How A Young Australian Kitesurfer Built A $3.2 Billion (Profitable!) Startup Phenom

On a steamy May morning in 2013, Canva CEO Melanie Perkins found herself adrift on a kiteboard in the channel between billionaire Richard Branson’s private Necker and Moskito islands. Her 30-foot sail floating deflated and useless beside her in the strong eastern Caribbean current, the 26-year-old entrepreneur waited for hours to be rescued. As she treaded water, her left leg scarred by a past collision with a coral reef, she reminded herself that her dangerous new hobby was worth it. After all, it was key to the fundraising strategy for the design-software startup she’d cofounded with her boyfriend six years before. Canva was based in Australia, thousands of miles from tech’s Silicon Valley power corridor. Getting a meeting—much less funding—was proving tough. Perkins heard “no” from more than 100 investors. So when she met the organizer of a group of kitesurfing venture capitalists at a pitch competition in her native Perth, Perkins got to training. The next time the group met to hear startup pitches and potentially write crucial early-stage funding checks, she’d have a seat at the table—even if it meant having to brave treacherous waters. “It was like, risk: serious damage; reward: start company,” Perkins says. “If you get your foot in the door just a tiny bit, you have to kind of wedge it all the way in.” Such perseverance has long been a necessity at Canva, which began as a modest yearbook-design business in the state capital of Perth on Australia’s west coast. From those remote origins, Canva has grown into a global juggernaut. Twenty-million-plus users from 190 countries use the company’s “freemium” Web-based app to design everything from splashy Pinterest graphics to elegant restaurant menus. Besides an impossible-to-beat price (millions of users pay nothing at all), Canva’s key advantage over rival products from tech giants like Adobe has been its ease of use. Before Canva, amateurs had to stitch together designs in Microsoft Word or pay through the nose for confusing professional tools. Today, anyone, anywhere, can download Canva and be creating within ten minutes. The company’s revenue comes from upselling to a $10-a-month premium version with snazzier features or, more recently, from sales of a streamlined corporate account option. High-quality stock photos—of which Canva has millions—cost another $1. It adds up. This year the company expects to more than double its revenue to $200 million; its most recent $85 million funding round valued it at $3.2 billion. Perkins, now 32 and an alum of the 2016 Forbes 30 Under 30 Asia list, has an estimated 15% stake, valued at $430 million. Throw in her 34-year-old cofounder—and now fiancé—Cliff Obrecht’s similar stake, and the Aussie power couple are likely worth more than $800 million. In an era of billion-dollar checks from SoftBank and high-profile profligacy at WeWork, Perkins and Obrecht do things differently. They are couch surfers who prefer budget trips to private jets. (This summer, with Canva already valued at…

sample accessily post 3

Canva Uncovered: How A Young Australian Kitesurfer Built A $3.2 Billion (Profitable!) Startup Phenom

On a steamy May morning in 2013, Canva CEO Melanie Perkins found herself adrift on a kiteboard in the channel between billionaire Richard Branson’s private Necker and Moskito islands. Her 30-foot sail floating deflated and useless beside her in the strong eastern Caribbean current, the 26-year-old entrepreneur waited for hours to be rescued. As she treaded water, her left leg scarred by a past collision with a coral reef, she reminded herself that her dangerous new hobby was worth it. After all, it was key to the fundraising strategy for the design-software startup she’d cofounded with her boyfriend six years before. Canva was based in Australia, thousands of miles from tech’s Silicon Valley power corridor. Getting a meeting—much less funding—was proving tough. Perkins heard “no” from more than 100 investors. So when she met the organizer of a group of kitesurfing venture capitalists at a pitch competition in her native Perth, Perkins got to training. The next time the group met to hear startup pitches and potentially write crucial early-stage funding checks, she’d have a seat at the table—even if it meant having to brave treacherous waters. “It was like, risk: serious damage; reward: start company,” Perkins says. “If you get your foot in the door just a tiny bit, you have to kind of wedge it all the way in.” Such perseverance has long been a necessity at Canva, which began as a modest yearbook-design business in the state capital of Perth on Australia’s west coast. From those remote origins, Canva has grown into a global juggernaut. Twenty-million-plus users from 190 countries use the company’s “freemium” Web-based app to design everything from splashy Pinterest graphics to elegant restaurant menus. Besides an impossible-to-beat price (millions of users pay nothing at all), Canva’s key advantage over rival products from tech giants like Adobe has been its ease of use. Before Canva, amateurs had to stitch together designs in Microsoft Word or pay through the nose for confusing professional tools. Today, anyone, anywhere, can download Canva and be creating within ten minutes. The company’s revenue comes from upselling to a $10-a-month premium version with snazzier features or, more recently, from sales of a streamlined corporate account option. High-quality stock photos—of which Canva has millions—cost another $1. It adds up. This year the company expects to more than double its revenue to $200 million; its most recent $85 million funding round valued it at $3.2 billion. Perkins, now 32 and an alum of the 2016 Forbes 30 Under 30 Asia list, has an estimated 15% stake, valued at $430 million. Throw in her 34-year-old cofounder—and now fiancé—Cliff Obrecht’s similar stake, and the Aussie power couple are likely worth more than $800 million. In an era of billion-dollar checks from SoftBank and high-profile profligacy at WeWork, Perkins and Obrecht do things differently. They are couch surfers who prefer budget trips to private jets. (This summer, with Canva already valued at…

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China’s Richest 2019: Growing Consumer Appetite Boosts Fortunes Of Nation’s Wealthiest

This story is part of Forbes’ coverage of China’s Richest 2019.

The headlines from China in the past year have been gloomy. Trade friction with the U.S. has risen, while GDP growth in the world’s second-largest economy slowed to a near three-decade low of 6%. Happily for the country’s wealthiest, however, there’s more good news than bad among the members of our list of China’s richest.

The total wealth of the 400 members of the China Rich List rose by more than a fifth from a year ago, to $1.29 trillion, as China’s consumers spent more on everything and spent more of it online. More than half the listees saw their fortunes climb in the past year, while a quarter saw their fortunes fall. The minimum net worth needed to make the list this year was $1 billion, back to 2017’s threshold, after dropping in 2018 to $840 million. There were 60 newcomers to the list; returnees made up most of the rest.

Topping the list for a second year is Jack Ma, who recently resigned as chairman of the e-commerce giant he co-founded, Alibaba, to focus on philanthropy. Ma’s fortune rose to $38.2 billion from $34.6 billion a year earlier as New York-listed Alibaba gained on China’s e-commerce boom. Second and third on the list: Tencent CEO Huateng “Pony” Ma, with a fortune worth $36 billion, and Evergrande Group Chairman Hui Ka Yan, worth an estimated $27.7 billion, their ranks are unchanged from last year.

Growing fortunes in online shopping appear throughout the list. Colin Huang, CEO of e-commerce site Pinduoduo, saw his estimated net worth soar to $21.2 billion from $11.25 billion last year as Pinduoduo gained on rival JD.com. Entrepreneurs who provide services tied to e-commerce also did well: Lai Meisong, CEO of Alibaba-backed express delivery firm ZTO, saw his fortune climb to $4.6 billion from $3.35 billion.

Pharmaceutical and healthcare fortunes are also benefitting as rising incomes enable Chinese to spend more on healthcare. Sun Piaoyang, chairman of Jiangsu Hengrui Medicine, moved up to No. 4 with a fortune of $25.8 billion. He shares that spot with his wife Zhong Huijuan. The two gained on growing business at Sun’s Hengrui as well as a Hong Kong IPO by Zhong-led company Jiangsu Hansoh Pharmaceutical. Li Xiting, chairman of medical equipment supplier Shenzhen Mindray Bio-Medical Electronics, also moved up to about $8.5 billion from $1.8 billion as its shares soared after the company relisted its shares at home in China following its 2016 delisting from the New York Stock Exchange.

Sportswear maker Anta Sports’ Hong Kong-listed shares have more than doubled in the past year, helping propel the fortune of its two leaders—brothers Ding Shizhong and Ding Shijia—up by almost 150% to $5.6 and $5.5 billion, respectively. Two Anta executives also landed on the list for the first time: CFO Lai Shixian, a Ding brother-in-law, at $1.4 billion and Wang Wenmo, a family cousin who manages Anta’s …

sample accessily post 2

China’s Richest 2019: Growing Consumer Appetite Boosts Fortunes Of Nation’s Wealthiest

This story is part of Forbes’ coverage of China’s Richest 2019.

The headlines from China in the past year have been gloomy. Trade friction with the U.S. has risen, while GDP growth in the world’s second-largest economy slowed to a near three-decade low of 6%. Happily for the country’s wealthiest, however, there’s more good news than bad among the members of our list of China’s richest.

The total wealth of the 400 members of the China Rich List rose by more than a fifth from a year ago, to $1.29 trillion, as China’s consumers spent more on everything and spent more of it online. More than half the listees saw their fortunes climb in the past year, while a quarter saw their fortunes fall. The minimum net worth needed to make the list this year was $1 billion, back to 2017’s threshold, after dropping in 2018 to $840 million. There were 60 newcomers to the list; returnees made up most of the rest.

Topping the list for a second year is Jack Ma, who recently resigned as chairman of the e-commerce giant he co-founded, Alibaba, to focus on philanthropy. Ma’s fortune rose to $38.2 billion from $34.6 billion a year earlier as New York-listed Alibaba gained on China’s e-commerce boom. Second and third on the list: Tencent CEO Huateng “Pony” Ma, with a fortune worth $36 billion, and Evergrande Group Chairman Hui Ka Yan, worth an estimated $27.7 billion, their ranks are unchanged from last year.

Growing fortunes in online shopping appear throughout the list. Colin Huang, CEO of e-commerce site Pinduoduo, saw his estimated net worth soar to $21.2 billion from $11.25 billion last year as Pinduoduo gained on rival JD.com. Entrepreneurs who provide services tied to e-commerce also did well: Lai Meisong, CEO of Alibaba-backed express delivery firm ZTO, saw his fortune climb to $4.6 billion from $3.35 billion.

Pharmaceutical and healthcare fortunes are also benefitting as rising incomes enable Chinese to spend more on healthcare. Sun Piaoyang, chairman of Jiangsu Hengrui Medicine, moved up to No. 4 with a fortune of $25.8 billion. He shares that spot with his wife Zhong Huijuan. The two gained on growing business at Sun’s Hengrui as well as a Hong Kong IPO by Zhong-led company Jiangsu Hansoh Pharmaceutical. Li Xiting, chairman of medical equipment supplier Shenzhen Mindray Bio-Medical Electronics, also moved up to about $8.5 billion from $1.8 billion as its shares soared after the company relisted its shares at home in China following its 2016 delisting from the New York Stock Exchange.

Sportswear maker Anta Sports’ Hong Kong-listed shares have more than doubled in the past year, helping propel the fortune of its two leaders—brothers Ding Shizhong and Ding Shijia—up by almost 150% to $5.6 and $5.5 billion, respectively. Two Anta executives also landed on the list for the first time: CFO Lai Shixian, a Ding brother-in-law, at $1.4 billion and Wang Wenmo, a family cousin who manages Anta’s …